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Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle and Virginia Rappe (Fake News: Fact Checking Hollywood Babylon Episode 3) by Karina Longworth

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At a boozy party over Labor Day weekend 1921, Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle, silent Hollywood’s superstar plus-size comedian, followed sometime actress Virginia Rappe into a hotel room. They were alone together for only a few minutes, but in that time, Rappe fell ill, and died several days later from her sickness. Arbuckle was tried for murder, and accused of rape in the newspapers. The story of the definitive sex-and-death scandal in early Hollywood history, which left a woman dead and effectively killed off a star comedian’s career, has been plagued with misinformation and distortions for nearly 100 years. Today we’ll closely examine Anger’s text to demonstrate how he implies both Arbuckle and Rappe’s guilt, and we’ll also use more recent scholarship on the case to try to suss out what really happened in that hotel room, and how the facts were distorted throughout Arbuckle’s three trials. 

This episode includes graphic descriptions of sexual violence. 

 Portrait of Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle wearing a smoking jacket and surrounded by kneeling young ladies, c. 1918

Portrait of Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle wearing a smoking jacket and surrounded by kneeling young ladies, c. 1918

 Virginia Rappe, c. 1920

Virginia Rappe, c. 1920

 Trashed hotel suite at the St. Francis Hotel, 1921

Trashed hotel suite at the St. Francis Hotel, 1921

Music:

Original music was composed for this episode by Evan Viola. Most of the rest of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is Modern History by The Auteurs.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

The Smoke Room - Gunnar Johnsén 

Widow’s Dance - Håkan Eriksson

Sophisticated Gentlemen 3 - Magnus Ringblom 

1920s Chicago 3 - Magnus Ringblom 

Kansas City flashback 2 - Magnus Ringblom 

Blue Zones - Martin Gauffin 

The Old House - Håkan Eriksson 

Bad News Piano 17 - Oscar Collin

Jazz and Blue Piano 1 - Jonaton Jarpehag

Bad News Piano 3 - Oscar Collin 

Paris Waltz - Håkan Eriksson 

Meditation for Viola and Piano 14 - Jonaton Jarpehag

My Simple Thing 3 - Peter Sandberg

Credits:

Our special guest this week is Gideon Yago.

This episode was written, narrated and produced by edited by Karina Longworth.

Editors: Sam Dingman and Jacob Smith.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

 Arbuckle's Mug Shot 1921

Arbuckle's Mug Shot 1921

Olive Thomas (Fake News: Fact Checking Hollywood Babylon Episode 2) by Karina Longworth

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Listen and download this episode, or find on Apple Podcasts.

The first Hollywood scandal to attract international intentional was the death-by-poison of Olive Thomas, the twenty-five year old star of au courant Hollywood hit The Flapper. According to Hollywood Babylon, Thomas’s death was the suicide of a woman desperate over her failure to score dope for her junkie husband. What’s the real story—and what role was played by Jack Pickford, Olive’s husband and the brother of the actress then considered “America’s Sweetheart”?

 Olive Thomas and Jack Pickford, c. 1920

Olive Thomas and Jack Pickford, c. 1920

 Special thanks to Allison Anders, who provided this image of Pickford and Thomas from her personal collection.

Special thanks to Allison Anders, who provided this image of Pickford and Thomas from her personal collection.

Music:

Original music was composed for this episode by Evan Viola. Most of the rest of music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is "The Upper Classes" by The Auteurs.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

The Smoke Room - Gunnar Johnsén 

Mississippi Ramble 1 - Martin Gauffin 

Sophisticated Gentlemen 3 - Magnus Ringblom

One Two Three 1 - Peter Sandberg 

Black and White Memories 3 - Martin Hall

Speakeasy 2

1920s Chicago 3 - Magnus Ringblom

Time To Tango - Håkan Eriksson 

Pesado Manouche 3 - John Ahlin

Widow’s Dance - Håkan Eriksson

Paris Waltz - Håkan Eriksson 

Say It Is So -Magnus Ringblom

Victoria’s Vintage Pearls 2 - Peter Sandberg

Jazz and Blue Piano 1 - Jonaton Jarpehag 

Credits:

Our special guest this week is Gideon Yago.

This episode was written, narrated and produced by edited by Karina Longworth.

Editors: Sam Dingman and Jacob Smith.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

D.W. Griffith, the Gish Sisters and the origin of "Hollywood Babylon" (Fake News: Fact Checking Hollywood Babylon Episode 1) by Karina Longworth

Hollywood Babylon Cover.jpg

Listen and download this episode, or find on Apple Podcasts.

This season will interrogate a book that is considered by many to be the urtext of salacious movieland gossip: Hollywood Babylon. Written by Kenneth Anger, a child actor turned director of experimental queer art films, Hollywood Babylon has been derided by some readers as a work of dangerous libel for its embellishments and, in some cases, outright fictions about real people and events. (Originally published in France in 1959, the book was not widely available in the US until 1975). Others have celebrated Anger’s bitchy tome as the ultimate, camp trolling of the movie industry and all of its sordid hypocrisy and corruption. Over the course of a two-part season (with part one exploring the silent era and part two, to come later in 2018, stretching from the 1930s into the late 1960s), we will examine some of the stories Anger tells and the way he tells them, and we’ll try to figure out the real story. Throughout, we’ll talk about how the seemingly contemporary concept of “fake news” has played a key role in Hollywood’s star-making (and star-destroying) apparatus from the industry’s earliest days, and how such practices mutated through the work of counter-narrators like Anger and beyond.

The phrase “Hollywood Babylon” entered the vernacular thanks to D.W. Griffith, one of Hollywood’s first great directors, who followed up the racist smash The Birth of a Nation with a less-successful historical epic called Intolerance. Anger’s use of that film’s Babylon set, which was left to stand and decay for years after the film came and went, as the structuring image of his gossip bible, helps to set the ironic tone of the book. But what of Anger’s accusations that Griffith was a known pedophile, and that his stars, sisters Dorothy and Lillian Gish, were incestuous?

 D.W. Griffith on set, c. 1918

D.W. Griffith on set, c. 1918

 Lillian Gish and Dorothy Gish, c. 1920

Lillian Gish and Dorothy Gish, c. 1920

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

This episode is a response to, and includes a brief excerpt from, Hollywood Babylon by Kenneth Anger.

The Parade’s Gone By by Kevin Brownlow

From Reverence to Rape by Molly Haskell

The Birth of a Nation: How a Legendary Filmmaker and a Crusading Editor Reignited America's Civil War by Dick Lehr

Lillian Gish: Her Legend, Her Life by Charles Affron

D.W. Griffith: An American Life by Richard Schickel  

Sunshine And Shadow by Mary Pickford

Wally: The True Wallace Reid Story by David W. Menefee

Silent Stars by Jeanine Basinger

“From Movie to Masterpiece” by Denison Clift, Oakland Tribune, April 28 1918, Page 18

Music:

Original music was composed for this episode by Evan Viola. Most of the rest of music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is "Sister Like You" by The Auteurs.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Black and White Memories 3 - Martin Hall

Say It Is So - Magnus Ringblom

The Old House - Håkan Eriksson

Chamber String Rock - Håkan Eriksson

Sophisticated Gentlemen - Magnus Ringblom

The Smoke Room - Gunnar Johnsén  

Jazz and Blue Piano 1 - Jonaton Jarpehag 

Finkelstein’s Walk in the Rain - Per-Anders Nilsson 

 

Credits:

Our special guest this week is TS Faull, who read from Hollywood Babylon. TS last appeared on You Must Remember This episode 49 in our "Charles Manson's Hollywood" season, in which he played Kenneth Anger. 

This episode was written, narrated and produced by edited by Karina Longworth.

Editors: Sam Dingman and Jacob Smith.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks

 Kenneth Anger on the set of  Lucifer Rising , 1970

Kenneth Anger on the set of Lucifer Rising, 1970

Bela and Boris Episode 6: Boris Karloff and Roger Corman by Karina Longworth

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Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Where Bela Lugosi lived his last decade in sad obscurity, Boris Karloff worked until the very end of his life, even as his body began to fall apart. Some of that work was for Roger Corman, the extremely prolific independent genre film producer whose movies helped to define the generation gap in the 1960's, while serving as a training ground for the next generation of auteurs. Karloff’s and Corman’s finest collaboration, Peter Bogdanovich’s directorial debut Targets, would serve as a bridge between cinematica eras, paying tribute to Karloff and his long career while depicting events that were shockingly of-the-moment--and still relevant today. Featuring Patton Oswalt as Boris Karloff and Rian Johnson as Roger Corman. 

 Director Roger Corman with Vincent Price on the set of  The House of Usher , 1960

Director Roger Corman with Vincent Price on the set of The House of Usher, 1960

 Boris Karloff in The Raven, 1963

Boris Karloff in The Raven, 1963

 Boris Karloff recording  How the Grinch Stole Christmas, 1966

Boris Karloff recording How the Grinch Stole Christmas, 1966

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources: 

The Moguls: Hollywood's Merchants of Myth by Norman J. Zierold

Silent Stars by Jeanine Basinger

A History of Horror by Wheeler Winston Dixon

Universal Horrors: The Studio’s Classic Films, 1931–1946, 2nd Ed. By Tom Weaver, Michael Brunas and Tom Brunas

Tome of Terror: Horror Films of the 1930s by Christopher Workman and Troy Howarth

City of Dreams: The Making and Remaking of Universal Pictures by Bernard F. Dick

Universal Studios Monsters: A Legacy of Horror by Michael Mallory

Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff: The Expanded Story of a Haunting Collaboration, with a Complete Filmography of Their Films Together by Gregory William Mank

Easy Riders, Raging Bulls by Peter Biskind

Who the Hell's in It: Conversations with Hollywood's Legendary Actors by Peter Bogdanovich

Roger Corman: Interviews (Conversations with Filmmakers Series) edited by Constantine Nasr

Roger Corman: Blood-Sucking Vampires, Flesh-Eating Cockroaches, and Driller Killers by Beverly Gray

"A Bucket of Blood" by David Kalat, TCM.com

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song "Weird Science" by Oingo Boingo. Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: "Waltz For Cello 1" by Jonatan Järpehag, "The Hipcat Swagger 3" by Martin Landh, "The Chairman of the Board 5" by Martin Landh, "Bachelor on the Move 1" by Martin Landh, "Bandit Dance" by Håkan Eriksson, "Bandit Dance 3" by Håkan Eriksson, "Optical Delusion 5" by Håkan Eriksson, "Wave Breaker" by Henrik Andersson, "Hot Rod Rebels 2" by Victor Olsson, "Psychedelic Background 2" by Merlean, "Bad Guy Approaching by Merlean, "Psychological Drama 4" by Marcus Ringblom, "Polka Dots" by Håkan Eriksson.

Sponsors:

This episode is sponsored by Winc.

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman and Jacob Smith, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Featuring Patton Oswalt as Boris Karloff and Rian Johnson as Roger Corman. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

 Boris Karloff in  Targets , 1968

Boris Karloff in Targets, 1968

Bela and Boris Episode 5: Bela Lugosi and Ed Wood by Karina Longworth

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Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Forgotten by Hollywood, struggling with morphine addiction and a dependency on alcohol, at the end of his life Bela Lugosi was welcomed into a rag tag bunch of micro-budget movie-making freaks led by Edward D. Wood Jr,, who would later become known as the worst filmmaker of all time. Through their collaborations on movies like Glen or Glenda? and Bride of the Monster, did Ed Wood help Bela, exploit him, or a little of both? Featuring Taran Killam as Bela Lugosi and Noah Segan as Ed Wood. 

 Bela Lugosi during a 1950's stage show. 

Bela Lugosi during a 1950's stage show. 

 Edward D. Wood Jr. (Ed Wood) c. 1950's 

Edward D. Wood Jr. (Ed Wood) c. 1950's 

 Bela Lugosi,  Glen or Glenda? , 1953

Bela Lugosi, Glen or Glenda?, 1953

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SHOW NOTES:  

Sources: 

The Moguls: Hollywood's Merchants of Myth by Norman J. Zierold

The Immortal Count: The Life and Films of Bela Lugosi by Arthur Lennig

Silent Stars by Jeanine Basinger

A History of Horror by Wheeler Winston Dixon

Universal Horrors: The Studio’s Classic Films, 1931–1946, 2nd Ed. By Tom Weaver, Michael Brunas and Tom Brunas

Tome of Terror: Horror Films of the 1930s by Christopher Workman and Troy Howarth

City of Dreams: The Making and Remaking of Universal Pictures by Bernard F. Dick

Universal Studios Monsters: A Legacy of Horror by Michael Mallory

Lois Weber in Early Hollywood by Shelley Stamp

Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff: The Expanded Story of a Haunting Collaboration, with a Complete Filmography of Their Films Together by Gregory William Mank

Ed Wood: Nightmare of Ecstasy by Rudolph Grey

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song: “Bela Lugosi's Dead” by Bauhaus. Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: "Waltz For Cello 1" by Jonatan Järpehag, "Mystery Minute 1" by Anders Ekengren, "Mercy Of The Wind 1" by Peter Sandberg, "Mercy Of The Wind 5" by Peter Sandberg, "Optical Delusion 3" by Håkan Eriksson, "Some Autumn Waltz 1" by Jonatan Järpehag, 
"Eccentric Vibes 4" by Håkan Eriksson, "Reflectif" (artist unknown), "At The Riviera 1" by Peter Sandberg, "Gagool" by Kevin MacLeod, "Etude No 3 For String Quartet" by Peter Sandberg, 

Sponsors:

This episode is sponsored by Squarespace and Blue Apron.

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman and Jacob Smith, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Featuring Taran Killam as Bela Lugosi and Noah Segan as Ed Wood. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

 Bela Lugosi, 1955

Bela Lugosi, 1955

Bela and Boris Episode 4: Bela vs. Boris by Karina Longworth

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Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Lugosi and Karloff, the two stars made by Universal’s monster movies, made eight films together. Today we’ll dive deep into some of these movies (including The Black Cat, The Raven, Son of Frankenstein and Val Lewton’s The Body Snatcher), and continue to explore how even when their careers brought them together, Karloff and Lugosi remained worlds apart. Featuring Patton Oswalt as Boris Karloff and Taran Killam as Bela Lugosi.

 Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff,  The Black Cat,  1934

Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff, The Black Cat, 1934

 Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi,  The Raven , 1935

Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi, The Raven, 1935

 Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi,  Son of Frankenstein , 1939

Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi, Son of Frankenstein, 1939

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources: 

The Moguls: Hollywood's Merchants of Myth by Norman J. Zierold

The Immortal Count: The Life and Films of Bela Lugosi by Arthur Lennig

Silent Stars by Jeanine Basinger

A History of Horror by Wheeler Winston Dixon

Universal Horrors: The Studio’s Classic Films, 1931–1946, 2nd Ed. By Tom Weaver, Michael Brunas and Tom Brunas

Tome of Terror: Horror Films of the 1930s by Christopher Workman and Troy Howarth

City of Dreams: The Making and Remaking of Universal Pictures by Bernard F. Dick

Universal Studios Monsters: A Legacy of Horror by Michael Mallory

Lois Weber in Early Hollywood by Shelley Stamp

Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff: The Expanded Story of a Haunting Collaboration, with a Complete Filmography of Their Films Together by Gregory William Mank

Fearing the Dark: The Val Lewton Career by Edmund G. Bansak

Icons of Grief: Val Lewton's Home Front Pictures by Alexander Nemerov

Val Lewton: The Reality of Terror by Joel E. Siegel

"'The Screen's Number One and Number Two Bogeymen': The Critical Reception of Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi in the 1930s and 1940s." by Mark Jancovich and Shane Brown. From Cult Film Stardom: Offbeat Attractions and Processes of Cultification

“Scare ‘Em To Death -- and Cash In” by Richard G. Hubler. Saturday Evening Post, May 23, 1942

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song: “Penthouse and Pavement” by Heaven 17.  Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: "Waltz For Cello 1" by Jonatan Järpehag, "Psychological Drama 4" by Magnus Ringblom, "Clumsy Detective 02" by Thomas Lundgren,  "Russian Dance Off" by Håkan Eriksson, "Victoria's Vintage Pearls 2" by Peter Sandberg, "Pet Cemetery" by Håkan Eriksson, "Eccentric Vibes 11" by Håkan Eriksson, "Baltic Waltz" by Håkan Eriksson, "Discovery - Blute Solo" by William T. Stromberg from Son of Frankenstein, 1939, "Vampires Suck" by Jon Björk, "Etude No. 3 for String Quartet" by Peter Sandberg, "Reflectif" (Artist unknown), "Some Autumn Waltz 1" by Jonatan Järpehag. 

Sponsors:

This episode is sponsored by the Great Courses Plus and Squarespace

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman and Jacob Smith, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Featuring Patton Oswalt as Boris Karloff and Taran Killam as Bela Lugosi. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

Double Feature Frankenstein and Dracula, 1952.jpg

Bela and Boris Episode 3: Boris and the Monsters by Karina Longworth

Annex - Karloff, Boris (Frankenstein)_09.jpg

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

After twenty years as a journeyman actor/laborer, Boris Karloff became an instant superstar as the Monster in Frankenstein (1931). Today we’ll explore how Karloff, unlike Lugosi, managed to maintain a steady stardom throughout the decades, returning to the monster that made him without feeling trapped by the character. Featuring Patton Oswalt as Boris Karloff.

 Jack P. Pierce preps Boris Karloff's hair and makeup for  Frankenstein , 1931

Jack P. Pierce preps Boris Karloff's hair and makeup for Frankenstein, 1931

 Boris Karloff,  The Mummy , 1932

Boris Karloff, The Mummy, 1932

 Elsa Lanchester and Boris Karloff in the  Bride of Frankenstein , 1935

Elsa Lanchester and Boris Karloff in the Bride of Frankenstein, 1935

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources: 

The Moguls: Hollywood's Merchants of Myth by Norman J. Zierold

The Immortal Count: The Life and Films of Bela Lugosi by Arthur Lennig

Silent Stars by Jeanine Basinger

A History of Horror by Wheeler Winston Dixon

Universal Horrors: The Studio’s Classic Films, 1931–1946, 2nd Ed. By Tom Weaver, Michael Brunas and Tom Brunas

Tome of Terror: Horror Films of the 1930s by Christopher Workman and Troy Howarth

City of Dreams: The Making and Remaking of Universal Pictures by Bernard F. Dick

Universal Studios Monsters: A Legacy of Horror by Michael Mallory

Lois Weber in Early Hollywood by Shelley Stamp

“Scare ‘Em To Death -- and Cash In” by Richard G. Hubler. Saturday Evening Post, May 23, 1942

"'The Screen's Number One and Number Two Bogeymen': The Critical Reception of Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi in the 1930s and 1940s." by Mark Jancovich and Shane Brown. From Cult Film Stardom: Offbeat Attractions and Processes of Cultification

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song: “Monster” by Kanye West.  Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: "Waltz for Cello 1" by Jonatan Järpehag, "Stalker" by Gunnar Johnsén, "Surfing Ghouls" by Håkan Eriksson, "Vampires Suck" by John Björk, "Undead Orchestra" by Håkan Eriksson, "Psychological Drama 4" by Magnus Ringblom, "Quirky Orchestra 5" by Josef Habib, "Clumsy Detective 02" by Thomas Lundgren, "Clumsy Detective 01" by Thomas Lundgren, "Russian Dance Off" by Håkan Eriksson, "Kingdom Of Baghk" by Vusal Zeinalov, "Menuetto And Storm" by Franz Waxman and Kenneth Alwyn from Bride of Frankenstein (1935), "The Tower Explodes and Finale" by Franz Waxman and Kenneth Alwyn from Bride of Frankenstein (1935), "Baltic Waltz" by Håkan Eriksson, "Victoria's Vintage Pearls 2" by Peter Sandberg, "Gagool" by Kevin MacLeod, "Mystery Minute 9" by Anders Ekengren.

Sponsors:

This episode is sponsored by the Great Courses Plus and Blue Apron.

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman and Jacob Smith, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Special thanks to Patton Oswalt who guest stars as Boris Karloff. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

 Boris Karloff in  Frankenstein 1970 , 1958

Boris Karloff in Frankenstein 1970, 1958

Bela and Boris Episode 2: Bela and the Vampires by Karina Longworth

Annex - Lugosi, Bela (Mark of the Vampire)_02.jpg

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

With Dracula (1931), Bela Lugosi instantly became the first horror star of sound cinema. It’s not easy being a trailblazer, and Bela would have difficulty capitalizing on his newfound stardom. In this episode we’ll discuss how Dracula made him, and trapped him, and trace the subsequent vampire roles that became his bread and butter.

 Bela Lugosi,  Dracula , 1931 

Bela Lugosi, Dracula, 1931 

 Helen Chandler and Bela Lugosi,  Dracula , 1931

Helen Chandler and Bela Lugosi, Dracula, 1931

 Bela Lugosi,  White Zombie , 1932

Bela Lugosi, White Zombie, 1932

 Bela Lugosi,  Return of the Vampire , 1943

Bela Lugosi, Return of the Vampire, 1943

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources: 

The Moguls: Hollywood's Merchants of Myth by Norman J. Zierold

The Immortal Count: The Life and Films of Bela Lugosi by Arthur Lennig

Silent Stars by Jeanine Basinger

A History of Horror by Wheeler Winston Dixon

Universal Horrors: The Studio’s Classic Films, 1931–1946, 2nd Ed. By Tom Weaver, Michael Brunas and Tom Brunas

Tome of Terror: Horror Films of the 1930s by Christopher Workman and Troy Howarth

City of Dreams: The Making and Remaking of Universal Pictures by Bernard F. Dick

Universal Studios Monsters: A Legacy of Horror by Michael Mallory

Lois Weber in Early Hollywood by Shelley Stamp

“Scare ‘Em To Death -- and Cash In” by Richard G. Hubler. Saturday Evening Post, May 23, 1942

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song: “Darkness” by The Human League. Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: “Waltz for Cello 1” by Jonatan Järpehag, “Clumsy Detective 01 and 02” by Thomas Lundgren, “Reflectif” (Artist unknown), “Mystery Minute 5” by Anders Ekengren, “Victoria's Vintage Pearls 2” by Peter Sandberg,  “Bad Guy Approaching” by Merlean, “Vampires Suck” by Jon Björk,  “Chant” (uncredited) from White Zombie (1932), “Russian Dance Off” by Håkan Eriksson, “Some Autumn Waltz 1” by Jonatan Järpehag, “Playful and Slightly Mysterious Orchestral” by Gavin Luke, “Quirky Orchestra 5” by Josed Habib.

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman and Jacob Smith, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Special thanks to Taran Killam who guest stars as Bela Lugosi. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

 Bela Lugosi,  Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, 1948

Bela Lugosi, Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, 1948

Bela and Boris Episode 1: Where the Monsters Came From by Karina Longworth

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Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff were two middle-aged, foreign, struggling actors who became huge stars thanks to Dracula and Frankenstein, the first two of a trend of monster movie hits released by Universal Studios during the 1930s. This season, we’ll discuss their parallel but very different lives and careers. Today, we’ll start by exploring where each man came from, what they were doing before they got to Universal, and why Universal began making monster movies in the first place.

 Universal City, c. 1915

Universal City, c. 1915

 Carl Laemmle (center) Carl Laemmle Jr. and his sister Rosabelle, c. 1930

Carl Laemmle (center) Carl Laemmle Jr. and his sister Rosabelle, c. 1930

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources: 

The Moguls: Hollywood's Merchants of Myth by Norman J. Zierold

The Immortal Count: The Life and Films of Bela Lugosi by Arthur Lennig

Silent Stars by Jeanine Basinger

A History of Horror by Wheeler Winston Dixon

Universal Horrors: The Studio’s Classic Films, 1931–1946, 2nd Ed. By Tom Weaver, Michael Brunas and Tom Brunas

Tome of Terror: Horror Films of the 1930s by Christopher Workman and Troy Howarth

City of Dreams: The Making and Remaking of Universal Pictures by Bernard F. Dick

Universal Studios Monsters: A Legacy of Horror by Michael Mallory

Lois Weber in Early Hollywood by Shelley Stamp

“Scare ‘Em To Death -- and Cash In” by Richard G. Hubler. Saturday Evening Post, May 23, 1942

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song: “Everyday is like Halloween” by Ministry. Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: "Waltz for Cello 1" by Jonatan Järpehag, "Russian Dance Off " by Håkan Eriksson, "Reflectif" (Artist Unknown), "Kingdom of Baghk" by Vusal Zeinalov, Audio from the film King of Jazz (1930), "Gagool" by Kevin MacLeod, "At the Riviera" by Peter Sandberg, "Some Autumn Waltz 1" by Jonatan Järpehag.

Sponsors:

This episode is sponsored by the Great Courses Plus and Blue Apron.

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman and Jacob Smith, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

 Bela Lugosi, c. 1920's 

Bela Lugosi, c. 1920's 

 Boris Karloff, c. 1920's 

Boris Karloff, c. 1920's 

The Last of Jean/Jane Works Out (Jean and Jane Episode 9) by Karina Longworth

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Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Jean Seberg, now plagued with mental illness and alcoholism, comes to a tragic end in Paris. Jane Fonda reinvents herself, once again, for the 80s.

 Jean Seberg with her third husband Dennis Berry, c. 1970's

Jean Seberg with her third husband Dennis Berry, c. 1970's

 Jean Seberg  Les Hautes Solitudes , 1974 | Image via NYTimes & Film Desk

Jean Seberg Les Hautes Solitudes, 1974 | Image via NYTimes & Film Desk

 Jon Voight and Jane Fonda at the Academy Awards, 1979 

Jon Voight and Jane Fonda at the Academy Awards, 1979 

 Lily Tomlin, Dolly Parton and Jane Fonda  9 to 5 , 1980

Lily Tomlin, Dolly Parton and Jane Fonda 9 to 5, 1980

 Katharine Hepburn, Henry Fonda and Jane Fonda  On Golden Pond , 1981

Katharine Hepburn, Henry Fonda and Jane Fonda On Golden Pond, 1981

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

Played Out: The Jean Seberg Story by David Richards

Breathless by Garry McGee

My Life So Far by Jane Fonda

Jane Fonda: The Private Life of a Public Woman by Patricia Bosworth

“The Vietnam Oscars” by Peter Biskind, Vanity Fair, March, 2008

“A Conversation with Philippe Garrel” by Vadim Rizov, January 13, 2016, filmmakermagazine.com

“A Showbiz Saint Grows Up or Whatever Happened to Jean Seberg” by Bart  Mills, June 16, 1974

“Review: ‘Les Hautes Solitudes,’ the Silent Sides of Jean Seberg (Mostly)” by Manohla Dargis, February 23, 2017

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song: “Message of Love” by The Pretenders. Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: “Meet Me In Queens 2” by Orjan Karlsson, “Dust 1” by Emil Axelsson, “My Island 3” by Jonatan Järpehag, “Quantum Jazz” by Chris MacLeod, “Devil’s Canyon 1” by Håkan Eriksson, “Groovy Development” by Christian Andersen, “The Diary” by Johannes Bornlof, “Into the Earth 4” by Gunnar Johnsen, “Drop World 6” by Niklas Ahlström, “Salty Breeze 1” by Martin Gauffin, “Readers Do You Read” by Chris Zabriskie, “Out of the Skies Under the Earth” by Chris Zabriskie, “My Island 2” by Jonatan Järpehag.

Sponsors:

This episode is sponsored by American Express and Naturebox and Great Courses Plus.

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

Coming Home (Jean and Jane Episode 8) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Jean buries her child in Iowa, and then returns to Paris in a fragile mental state. Increasingly plagued by both justifiable paranoia and delusions, she makes her last significant films (including another misguided collaboration with Romain Gary), and another attempt at marriage. Back in the States, Jane subsumes her passion for activism into her new marriage to Tom Hayden, and works to get her movie career back on track by producing commercial yet socially conscious vehicles in which she can star in. One of these films, Coming Home, would become both an anti-war and feminist landmark, and would win Jane another Oscar.

 Jean Seberg and Dennis Berry at the  Last Tango in Paris  premiere, 1972 

Jean Seberg and Dennis Berry at the Last Tango in Paris premiere, 1972 

 Jane Fonda, Tom Hayden and their son Troy Garity, Santa Monica, c. 1975

Jane Fonda, Tom Hayden and their son Troy Garity, Santa Monica, c. 1975

 Jon Voight and Jane Fonda,  Coming Home , 1978 

Jon Voight and Jane Fonda, Coming Home, 1978 

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song: “Ecstasy” by PJ Harvey. Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: “Meet Me in Queens 2” by Orjan Karlsson, “Easy Lynch Guitars 1” by Johan Hynynen, “Earthbound 1” by Joachim Nilsson, “Salty Breeze”, “Earthbound 1” by Joachim Nilsson, “Tomorrow I'll Be Gone” by Franz Gordon, “Easy Lynch Guitars 2” by Johan Hynynen, “Modern “Vintage Gypsy 2” by Gavin Luke, “Devils Canyon 1” by Håkan Eriksson, “Song For Johanna” by Franz Gordon, “Mediterranean Mix 10” by Stefan Netsman, “Groovy Development” by Christian Andersen, “Musique a la Carte 5” by John Ahlin, “Last Exit To Earth” by Håkan Eriksson, “A Trace Of Light 2” by Magnus Ringblom, “I Need to Start Writing Things Down” by Chris Zabriskie.

Sponsors:

This episode is sponsored by Audible, American Express and Winc.

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

Hanoi Jane and the FBI vs. Jean Seberg's Baby (Jean and Jane Episode 7) by Karina Longworth

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Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

After shooting a film with a much-changed Jean-Luc Godard, Jane Fonda travels to Vietnam, where she naively participates in a stunt that would leave her branded “Hanoi Jane” for decades. The world media had a field day mocking her, the US government set to work plotting to destroy her, and Jane would seek refuge in a new relationship with activist-turned-politician Tom Hayden. Meanwhile, in the midst of divorcing Romain Gary, Jean found herself pregnant. Having wiretapped a phone call between Jean and a Black Panther about her pregnancy, the FBI decided to “neutralize” both Seberg and her unborn child.

 Jane Fonda and Donald Sutherland during a F.T.A. performance, 1971

Jane Fonda and Donald Sutherland during a F.T.A. performance, 1971

 Jane Fonda accepts her Academy Award for Best Actress, 1972

Jane Fonda accepts her Academy Award for Best Actress, 1972

 Jane Fonda during her 1972 visit to Hanoi, North Vietnam 

Jane Fonda during her 1972 visit to Hanoi, North Vietnam 

 Jean Seberg and David Janssen,  Macho Callahan , 1970 

Jean Seberg and David Janssen, Macho Callahan, 1970 

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SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

Played Out: The Jean Seberg Story by David Richards

Breathless by Garry McGee

A Taste of Power: A Black Woman's Story by Elaine Brown

My Story by Jane Fonda

Jane Fonda: The Private Life of a Public Woman by Patricia Bosworth

Jane Fonda's War: A Political Biography Of An Antiwar Icon by Mary Hershberger

“Barbarella Goes Radical” by Susan McLeland from the book Headline Hollywood: A Century of Film Scandal edited by Adrienne L. McLean and David A Cook

“The Authorized Version : How I Fell in Love With Jane” by Tom Hayden, Los Angeles Times, May 5, 1988

“Total recall” by John Patterson, TheGuardian.com, September 2, 2005

“The Truth About My Trip To Hanoi” by Jane Fonda, JaneFonda.com, July 22, 2011

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song: “A Mistake” by Fiona Apple. Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: “Meet Me in Queens 2” by Orjan Karlsson, “Easy Lynch Guitars 1” by Johan Hynynen, “EarthBound 1” by Joachim Nilsson, “Salty Breeze”, “Earthbound 1” by Joachim Nilsson, “Tomorrow I'll Be Gone” by Franz Gordon, “Easy Lynch Guitars 2” by Johan Hynynen, “Modern Vintage Gypsy 2” by Gavin Luke, “Devils Canyon 1” by Håkan Eriksson, “Song For Johanna” by Franz Gordon, “Mediterranean Mix 10” by Stefan Netsman, “Groovy Development” by Christian Andersen, “Musique a la Carte 5” by John Ahlin, “Last Exit To Earth” by Håkan Eriksson, “A Trace Of Light 2” by Magnus Ringblom, “I Need to Start Writing Things Down” by Chris Zabriskie.

Sponsors:

This episode is sponsored by The Great Courses Plus and American Express.

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

Jane vs. Barbarella (Jean and Jane Episode 5) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Having coaxed Jane into participating in an open marriage, Vadim began casting her in films as a male fantasy of female sexual liberation. This phase of her career would peak with Barbarella, a sci-fi film based on an erotic comic book featuring Jane as a horny space warrior. Jane’s perfect body was on full display and fetishized the world over, but no one knew the self-destruction that went on behind the scenes in order to maintain her looks. While Vadim was building her up as an international sex kitten, Jane was gradually becoming more socially conscious. For all of his experience with women, Roger Vadim didn’t know what to do with a woke wife.

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

Jane Fonda: The Private Life of a Public Woman by Patricia Bosworth

My Life So Far by Jane Fonda

Bardot, Deneuve, Fonda by Roger Vadim

Easy Riders, Raging Bulls by Peter Biskind

“Barbarella Goes Radical” by Susan McLeland, from the book Headline Hollywood: A Century of Film Scandal edited by Adrienne L. McLean and David A Cook  

“Heres What Happened to Baby Jane” by Gerald Jonas, The New York Times, January 22, 1967

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song: “Gloria” by Patti Smith. Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: "Groovy Development " by Christian Andersen, "Neighbours At Night 2" by Martin Hall, "Salty Breeze 1" by Martin Gauffin, "Easy Lynch Guitars 2" by Johan Hynynen, "Swamp Fever 3" by Håkan Eriksson, "Old Time Action 2" by Gunnar Johnsén, "Psychedelic Weirdo Lounge" by Håkan Eriksson, "A Mysterious Presence" by Håkan Eriksson, "You're In Trouble Deep" by Anders Bothén, "Ambient Acoustic Guitar 19" by Anders Ekengren, "Ambient Acoustic Guitar 18" by Anders Ekengren, "Meet The Macho Man 1" by Bo Järpehag, "Meet Me in Queens 2" by Orjan Karlsson, "Suburban Life 3" by Gavin Luke, "High Stakes" by Nicklas Ahlstrom.

Sponsors:

This episode is sponsored by Blue Apron, Naturebox and American Express.

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

Jean vs. Lilith (Jean and Jane Episode 4) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Having left her husband to be the mistress of writer/diplomat Romain Gary, Jean secretly gave birth to a son, and then made the movie that she thought would prove herself as an actress once and for all. In Lilith, Seberg would go all in on her portrayal of madness -- perhaps too deep. After a disastrous collaboration with Gary, Jean happily accepted an offer to star in a big budget Hollywood musical. But it was 1969, the studio system had crumbled, and that musical -- Paint Your Wagon -- would become a symbol of everything that was wrong with the Hollywood establishment.

 Jean Seberg and Romain Gary, 1960's

Jean Seberg and Romain Gary, 1960's

 Jean-Pierre Cassel and Jean Seberg in  Five Day Lover  (1961)

Jean-Pierre Cassel and Jean Seberg in Five Day Lover (1961)

 Jean Seberg and Warren Beatty and in  Lilith  (1964)

Jean Seberg and Warren Beatty and in Lilith (1964)

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

Jane Fonda: The Private Life of a Public Woman by Patricia Bosworth

My Life So Far by Jane Fonda

Played Out: The Jean Seberg Story by David Richards

Star: The Life and Wild Times of Warren Beatty by Peter Biskind

The Kid Stays in the Picture: A Notorious Life by Robert Evans

The Talent Scout by Romain Gary

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song: “Schizophrenia” by Sonic Youth. Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: “Modern Vintage Gypsy 3” by Gavin Luke, “Readers Do You Read” by Chris Zabriskie, “Meet Me In Queens 2” by Orjan Karlsson, “A Trace of Light 2” by Magnus Ringblom, “Musique a la Carte 5” by John Ahlin, “Song for Johanna” by Franz Gordon, “Some Autumn Waltz 1” by Jonatan Järpehag, “Latin Quarters Jazz Band 2” by Magnus Ringblom, “Les Beaux Jours 3” by Martin Gauffin, “Past Closing Time 3” by Magnus Ringblom, “High Stakes” by Niklas Ahlstrom, “Suburban Life 3” by Gavin Luke.

Sponsors:

This episode is sponsored by The Great Courses Plus, Audible and American Express.

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

 Maurice Ronet and Jean Seberg in  Birds in Peru  (1968)

Maurice Ronet and Jean Seberg in Birds in Peru (1968)

Jean and Jane in Paris (Jean and Jane Episode 3) by Karina Longworth

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Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

With her Hollywood career already something of a disappointment, Jean Seberg took a chance on a French film critic turned first-time director who wanted her to play an amoral American in an experimental movie without a script. The result was Breathless, the catalyzing hit of the French New Wave and the movie that would make Jean Seberg an icon. Soon thereafter, Jane Fonda got her own invitation to come make a movie in Paris, where she’d soon fall in love with Roger Vadim, the man who discovered Brigitte Bardot. Jane Fonda would become Vadim’s new creative muse, as well as his third wife.

 Jean Seberg with first husband François Moreuil in Paris, 1959, Photo by Mark Shaw

Jean Seberg with first husband François Moreuil in Paris, 1959, Photo by Mark Shaw

 Jane Fonda and Roger Vadim at ther wedding in Las Vegas, 1965, Photo by Dennis Hopper

Jane Fonda and Roger Vadim at ther wedding in Las Vegas, 1965, Photo by Dennis Hopper

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

Jane Fonda: The Private Life of a Public Woman by Patricia Bosworth

My Life So Far by Jane Fonda

Played Out: The Jean Seberg Story by David Richards

Everything Is Cinema: The Working Life of Jean-Luc Godard by Richard Brody

Laid Bare: A Memoir of Wrecked Lives and the Hollywood Death Trip by John Gilmore

Jean Seberg interview with Mike Wallace

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song: “Paris” by Lana Del Ray. Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: “Meet Me In Queens 2” by Örjan Karlsson, “Surfing Ghouls” by Håkan Eriksson, “Song For Johanna” by Franz Gordon, “Latin Quarters Jazz Band 2” by Magnus Ringblom, “Past Closing Time 3” by Magnus Ringblom, “Widows Dance” by Håkan Eriksson, “Ambient Acoustic Guitar 18” by Anders Ekengren, “Cinema Francais 4” by Magnus Ringblom, “Modern Vintage Gypsy 2” by Gavin Luke, “Modern Vintage Gypsy 3” by Gavin Luke, “Musique A La Carte 05” by John Åhlin, “Nightclub Standoff” by Håkan Eriksson, “Meet Me In Queens 3” by Örjan Karlsson, “Easy Lynch Guitars 2” by Johan Hynynen.

Sponsors:

This episode is sponsored by The Great Courses Plus

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

 Jean-Luc Godard, Raoul Cotard, Jean Seberg and Jean-Paul Belmondo on the set of  Breathless , 1960, Photo by Raymond Cauchetier

Jean-Luc Godard, Raoul Cotard, Jean Seberg and Jean-Paul Belmondo on the set of Breathless, 1960, Photo by Raymond Cauchetier

 Jane Fonda and Alain Delon in  Joy House , 1964

Jane Fonda and Alain Delon in Joy House, 1964

Jean and Otto Preminger/Jane in New York (Jean and Jane Episode 2) by Karina Longworth

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Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Jean Seberg made her first two films, Saint Joan and Bonjour Tristesse, for director Otto Preminger, a tyrannical svengali character whose methods would traumatize Jean for the rest of her life and career. No wonder she rebelled against this bad dad figure by marrying a handsome French opportunist. Meanwhile, Jane Fonda moves to New York, joins the Actors Studio, takes up with her own hyper-controlling male partner, and tries to define herself as something other than Henry Fonda’s daughter.

 Jean Seberg and Otto Preminger, c. late 1950's 

Jean Seberg and Otto Preminger, c. late 1950's 

 Jean Seberg in Bonjour Tristesse, 1958

Jean Seberg in Bonjour Tristesse, 1958

 Jane Fonda in a stage production of There Was A Little Girl, 1960 

Jane Fonda in a stage production of There Was A Little Girl, 1960 

 Jane Fonda and Rod Taylor in  Sunday in New York , 1963

Jane Fonda and Rod Taylor in Sunday in New York, 1963

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

Jane Fonda: The Private Life of a Public Woman by Patricia Bosworth

My Life So Far by Jane Fonda

The World and Its Double: The Life and Work of Otto Preminger by Chris Fujiwara

Played Out: The Jean Seberg Story by David Richards

Preminger: An Autobiography by Otto Preminger

“Two Saint Joans, Old and New” by L.R. Swainson, The Age, February 12, 1957

Photo of Otto Preminger kissing Seberg from Los Angeles Times, October 22, 1956

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song: “Since U Been Gone” by Kelly Clarkson. Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: “Meet Me In Queens 1, 2 and 3” by Örjan Karlsson, “By the Lake in the Evening” by Franz Gordon, “Be Still” by Johannes Bornlöf, “Widows Dance” by Håkan Eriksson, “Musique A La Carte 01” by John Åhlin, “Weekly” by Martin Gauffin, “Swing Manouche 05” by John Åhlin, “Old Time Action 2” by Gunnar Johnsén, “Cadillac Quiff Boys 1” by Victor Olsson, “Hot Rod Rebels 5” by Victor Olsson, “Hippies On A Bus 1” by Martin Landh, “It Takes Four” by Niklas Ahlstrom, “Readers Do You Read” by Chris Zabriskie.

Sponsors:

This episode is sponsored by Blue Apron, Naturebox and Squarespace.

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

Hollywood Royalty/Middle-American Martyr (Jean and Jane, Episode 1) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Introducing our new series, “Jean and Jane,” exploring the parallel lives of Jane Fonda and Jean Seberg, two white American actresses who found great success (and husbands) in France before boldly and controversially lending their celebrity to causes like civil rights and the anti-war movement. Fonda and Seberg were both tracked by the FBI during the Nixon administration, which considered both actresses to be threats to national security. But for all their similarities, Jane and Jean would end up on different paths. They also started from very different circumstances. Today we’ll track Jane’s difficult upbringing with her famous but absentee father and troubled mother, and the path of privilege -- and tragedy -- that led her to the Actor’s Studio. Meanwhile, in small town, church-dominated Iowa, Jean Seberg announced herself as the town rebel at age 14 when she joined the NAACP. Three years later, she was plucked out of obscurity by a mad genius movie director to star in one of the highest-profile Hollywood movies of the late-50s.

 Jean Seberg at her screen test for Saint Joan, 1956, Photo Bob Willoughby

Jean Seberg at her screen test for Saint Joan, 1956, Photo Bob Willoughby

 The Fonda family, 1949, Photo by Genevieve Naylor

The Fonda family, 1949, Photo by Genevieve Naylor

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

Jane Fonda: The Private Life of a Public Woman by Patricia Bosworth

My Life So Far by Jane Fonda

The World and Its Double: The Life and Work of Otto Preminger by Chris Fujiwara

Played Out: The Jean Seberg Story by David Richards

The anti-Jane Fonda video mentioned in this episode. 

Music:

All of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, is from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. Outro song: "Modern Girl" by Sleater-Kinney. Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode: "A Trace of Light 2" by Magnus Ringblom, "Memories of November" by Martin Landh, "Widows Dance" by Hakan Eriksson, "Musique A La Carte" by John Ahlin, "Mediterranean Mix 10" by Stefan Netsman, "Upbeat Flatfeet 2" by Martin Gauffin, "Les Beaux Jours" 3 by Martin Gauffin, "Ambient Acoustic Guitar 18" by Anders Ekengren, "Ripples" by Peter Sandberg, "By the Lake in the Evening" by Franz Gordon, "Gypsy Guitar Swing" by Martin Carlsberg,  "Discretion" by Peter Sandberg.

Sponsors:

This episode is sponsored by Winc, Squarespace and Audible.

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

 Jane Fonda on the Cover of VOGUE, July 1959

Jane Fonda on the Cover of VOGUE, July 1959

Barbara Loden (Dead Blondes Episode 12) by Karina Longworth

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Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Barbara Loden won a Tony Award for playing a character based on Marilyn Monroe in Arthur Miller’s After the Fall. Like Marilyn, Barbara was a beauty with no pedigree who fled a hopeless upbringing in search of the fulfillment of fame. Like Marilyn, Loden found some measure of security as the mistress (and eventual wife) of a powerful man, in Loden’s case Elia Kazan. But instead of satisfying her, her small taste of fame and her relationship with Kazan left Barbara Loden wanting more, which would lead her to write, direct and star in a groundbreaking independent movie of her own.

 Author Arthur Miller, Barbara Loden and Jason Robards Jr.,  After the Fall, 1964

Author Arthur Miller, Barbara Loden and Jason Robards Jr.,  After the Fall, 1964

 Barbara Loden and Elia Kazan, 1969

Barbara Loden and Elia Kazan, 1969

 Barbara Loden, writer-director-star of  Wanda

Barbara Loden, writer-director-star of Wanda

Show notes:

Sources:

I wrote about the restoration of Wanda for the LA Weekly in 2011. Though I did additional research for this episode, I incorporated some text and research from that earlier piece here.

Other sources:

Elia Kazan, A Life by Elia Kazan

Suite for Barbara Loden by Nathalie Leger

Elia Kazan: The Cinema of an American Outsider by Brian Neve

The Mommie Dearest Diary: Carol Ann Tells All by Rutanya Alda

“Conversation on Wanda by Barbara Loden” by Marguerite Duras and Elia Kazan

“The Lonely Female Taxi Driver: Barbara Loden's Wanda” by Jacqueline Valencia

Barbara Loden clippings files, Margaret Herrick Library, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

Grace Kelly (Dead Blondes Episode 11) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

The quintessential “Hitchcock blonde,” Grace Kelly had an apparently charmed life. Her movies were mostly hits, her performances were largely well reviewed, and she won an Oscar against stiff competition. Then she literally married a prince. Was it all as perfect as it seemed? Today we’ll explore Kelly’s public and private life (and the rumors that the two things were very different), her working relationship with Hitchcock, her Oscar-winning performance in The Country Girl, the royal marriage that took her away from Hollywood and Kelly’s very specific spin on blonde sexuality.

Show notes:

Sources:

High Society: The Life of Grace Kelly by Donald Spoto

Spellbound by Beauty: Alfred Hitchcock and His Leading Ladies by Donald Spoto

Grace Kelly: The Secret Life of a Princess by James Spada

Credits:

This episode was edited by Sam Dingman, and produced by Karina Longworth with the assistance of Lindsey D. Schoenholtz. Our logo was designed by Teddy Blanks.

Barbara Payton (Dead Blondes Episode 10) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

In our Joan Crawford series, we talked about Barbara Payton as the young, troubled third wife of Crawford’s ex Franchot Tone, whose inability to choose between Tone and another actor brought all three of them down into tabloid Hell. Today, we revisit Payton’s story, and expand it, to explore her rise to quasi-fame, and the slippery slope that reduced her from “most likely to succeed” to informal prostitution, to formal prostitution, and finally to a way-too-early grave.

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 Barbara Payton entering California Hospital to see Franchot Tone after his fight with Tom Neal, 1951, Photo Courtesy of Los Angeles Herald Examiner Collection/Los Angeles Public Library

Barbara Payton entering California Hospital to see Franchot Tone after his fight with Tom Neal, 1951, Photo Courtesy of Los Angeles Herald Examiner Collection/Los Angeles Public Library

i-am-not-ashamed.jpg

Show notes:

I wrote our first episode on Barbara Payton, during the Joan Crawford series, while I was living in London, and I couldn’t get my hands on an actual copy of I Am Not Ashamed, Payton’s ghostwritten autobiography. Shortly after I returned to Los Angeles, I found a copy at Larry Edmunds Bookshop on Hollywood Boulevard -- apparently it was re-released, in the US at least, in paperback shortly before I made the original episode. So though this was originally intended to be a re-run, this episode is now more new than old.

Sources:

I Am Not Ashamed by Barbara Payton

Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye by John O’Dowd

Notes From the Unashamed by Kim Morgan, Sunset Gun 

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