The Seduced

Gina Lollobrigida (The Seduced, Episode 6) by Karina Longworth

Gina Lollobrigida in the 1960s.jpg

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

This Italian pin-up, along with Sophia Loren and Brigitte Bardot, was emblematic of a brand of post-war European sexuality that America happily imported. But the Hollywood career of  “La Lollo” was delayed, thanks to Howard Hughes, whose obsession with Lollobrigida led him to keep her virtually imprisoned in a Los Angeles hotel, and sign her to a contract that made it essentially impossible for her to work for any other US producer.

 Gina Lollobrigida in  Bread, Love and Dreams , 1953

Gina Lollobrigida in Bread, Love and Dreams, 1953

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “For Tomorrow” by Blur.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Reflectif - Artist Unknown 

Rendezvous 3 - Martin Landh 

Mysterious Grand Piano - Jonas Elander

Cluedo - Hakan Erikson

Sophisticated Gentleman 3 - Magnus Kingbloom

My Simple Thing 2 - Peter Sandberg

Yellow Leaves 5 - Peter Sandberg

After the Freakshow - Jenny Roos

Jazz and Blue Piano 1-Jonatan Jarpehag

Campers Day-Magnus Ringblom

Tomorrow I’ll Be Gone - Franz Gordon

Speakeasy 2 - Gunnar Johnsen

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Olivia Natt.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

 Gina Lollobrigida, 2014 | Photograph by Jonathan Becker for Vanity Fair

Gina Lollobrigida, 2014 | Photograph by Jonathan Becker for Vanity Fair

Yvonne De Carlo (The Seduced, Episode 5) by Karina Longworth

Yvonne_De_Carlo_publicity_photo c. 1955.jpg

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

The future Lily Munster became a star when producer Walter Wanger cast her in Salome, Where She Danced (1945). A curvaceous brunette in her early 20s, De Carlo fit the mold of Howard Hughes’s mid-century girlfriends to a T. But that relationship would be brief, and De Carlo would go on to distinguish herself in movies, TV and as a star of the original production of Stephen Sondheim’s Follies.

 Yvonne De Carlo in Salome, Where She Danced (1945)

Yvonne De Carlo in Salome, Where She Danced (1945)

b31c7f2e8df4d31a382dc173d21d0e5a.jpg

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Sing” by Blur.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Reflectif - Artist Unknown 

Green Lace - Artist Unknown

The Smoke Room - Gunnar Johnsen

Tomorrow I’ll Be Gone - Franz Gordon

Speakeasy 2 - Gunnar Johnsen

Club Noir-2 - John Ahlin

Rendezvous 3 - Martin Landh

The Charleston 3 - Hakan Ericsson

Mas Cerca De Ti 5 - Martin Carlberg

Campers Day - Magnus Ringbloom

Muensters Theme Song - Jack Marshall 

 Yvonne De Carlo as Lily Munster, c. 1964

Yvonne De Carlo as Lily Munster, c. 1964

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Olivia Natt.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

De Carlo, Yvonne_04.jpg

Linda Darnell (The Seduced, Episode 4) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

A stunning brunette sex symbol married to cinematographer Pev Marley, Darnell thought her affair with Hughes would result in marriage to the aviator. But after Hughes’s near-fatal 1946 plane crash, Marley tried to make a deal to sell his wife to the tycoon--which was not what Darnell wanted. This was not the low point of a life that ended in incredible tragedy, amidst a career that, to this day, has not been given the acclaim it deserves.

 Linda Darnell, Jeanne Crain, Ann Sothern, and John Venn in  A Letter to Three Wives , 1949

Linda Darnell, Jeanne Crain, Ann Sothern, and John Venn in A Letter to Three Wives, 1949

 Linda Darnell & Joseph L. Mankiewicz, c. 1948

Linda Darnell & Joseph L. Mankiewicz, c. 1948

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “She’s So High” by Blur.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Reflective - Artist Unknown 

Song for Johanna - Franz Gordon

Tomorrow I’ll Be Gone - Franz Gordon

Mas Cerca De Ti 5 - Martin Carlberg

Whiskey Rondo - Hakan Eriksson

Time for Miles - Artist Unknown 

Club Noir 2 - John Ahlin

Speakeasy 2 - Gunnar Johnsen

Victoria’s Vintage Pearls 3 - Peter Sandberg

Sunset - Kai Engel

Sweet Flower Girl - Artist Unknown 

Dust Bowl 1 - Hakan Eriksson

Jazz And Blue Piano 1 - Jonatan Jarpehag 

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Olivia Natt.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

Linda Darnell out (5).jpg

Ann Dvorak (The Seduced, Episode 3) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

The child of a silent film actress, Dvorak was so determined to be a star that at first, she wouldn’t take no for an answer. Her big break came when she was cast in Howard Hughes’s production of Scarface. But Hughes would sell her contract to Warner Brothers, and when Ann later accused Hughes of having “sold [her] down the river,”  she would swiftly suffer the consequences of going up against Hughes in the press when his mastery over the medium of publicity was at its peak.

 Paul Muni and Ann Dvorak and in  Scarface , 1932

Paul Muni and Ann Dvorak and in Scarface, 1932

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

Seduction: Sex, Lies, and Stardom in Howard Hughes’s Hollywood by Karina Longworth

Ann Dvorak: Hollywood's Forgotten Rebel by Christina Rice

Howard Hawks: The Grey Fox of Hollywood by Todd McCarthy

“Sold Down the River’ Declares Ann Dvorak.” Los Angeles Times, July 19, 1932

Production Code Administration files on Scarface, Margaret Herrick Library

Lincoln Quarberg files, Special Collections, Margaret Herrick Library

Clips from Scarface (1932) and The Strange Love of Molly Louvain (1932)

 Ann Dvorak and Richard Cromwell in  The Strange Love of Molly Louvain  (1932)

Ann Dvorak and Richard Cromwell in The Strange Love of Molly Louvain (1932)

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Slow Down” by Blur.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Reflectif - Artist Unknown 

Time for Miles - Artist Unknown 

Kansas City Flashback 1 - Magnus Ringbloom

Club Noir 2 - John Ahlin

Yellow Leaves 5 - Peter Sandberg

Whiskey Rondo - Hakan Eriksson

Cluedo - Hasan Eriksson 

Tomorrow I’ll Be Gone - Franz Gordon

The Smoke Room - Gunnar Johnson

Loser - Anders Ekengren

After the Freakshow - Jenny Roos

Victoria’s Vintage Pearls 3 - Peter Sandberg

Jazz and Blue Piano 1 - Jonathan Jarpehag

Traceless 5 - Peter Sandberg

Empty Streets - Gunnar Johnson

Got That Feeling - Peter Sandberg

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Special Guest Noah Segan as Howard Hughes

Editor: Olivia Natt.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.


ENTER THE SEDUCTION SIGNED COPY GIVEAWAY!

 Calling all fans of the You Must Remember This podcast: Karina has teamed up with her publisher to give fifty lucky listeners an exclusive chance to win a signed copy of Seduction. Learn more and enter below before November 27th for the chance to win one of the 50 copies available!

 Open to U.S. residents 18 years of age and older only. Rules and regulations apply.


 Photo from the personal scrapbook of Ann Dvorak/Collection of Christina Rice via Huffington Post

Photo from the personal scrapbook of Ann Dvorak/Collection of Christina Rice via Huffington Post

The Bacchanal of 1920s Hollywood, via Frederica Sagor Maas (The Seduced, Episode 2) by Karina Longworth

Frederica Sagor Maas.jpg

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Seduction begins at an MGM sponsored orgy at the Ambassador Hotel, as told through the eyes of one of the attendees, a young female screenwriter named Frederica Sagor. Sagor would go on to pen one of the frankest memoirs of 1920s Hollywood ever written, revealing the systematic sexual exploitation of women in the film industry by men like Marshall Neilan -- one of Howard Hughes’s early mentors. Frederica’s story also details how tough it was for a woman to hold on to power behind the scenes in the film industry as Hollywood evolved. 

Screen Shot 2018-10-17 at 5.15.37 PM.png

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

Seduction: Sex, Lies, and Stardom in Howard Hughes’s Hollywood by Karina Longworth

The Shocking Miss Pilgrim by Frederica Sagor Maas

Lois Weber in Early Hollywood by Shelley Stamp

Are the Stars Out Tonight? The Story of the Famous Ambassador and Cocoanut Grove “Hollywood’s Hotel” by Margaret Tante Burk

Marshall Neilan’s autobiographical notes, Marshall Neilan special collection, Margaret Herrick Library

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “It Could Be You” by Blur.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Reflectif (Artist Unknown)

The Charleston 1 Hakan Ericsson

Club Noir 4-John Ahlin

Waltz for Cello 3—Jonatan Jarpehag

42nd and Broadway (Artist Unknown)  

Got That Feeling-Peter Sandberg

My Simple Thing—Peter Sandberg

Chamber String Rock-Hakan Ericsson

Kansas City Flashback 1-Magnus Ringbloom

Sad Drama 4-Merlean

Loser-Anders Ekengren

Black and White Memories 3-Martin Hall

Jazz And Blue Piano 1-Jonathan Jarpehag

Viona’s Lullaby-Peter Sandberg

Sunset—Kai Vogel

 Marshall Neilan and Mary Pickford on set, c. 1920's | Photo via the Mary Pickford Foundation

Marshall Neilan and Mary Pickford on set, c. 1920's | Photo via the Mary Pickford Foundation

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Olivia Natt.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

 Frederica Sagor Maas

Frederica Sagor Maas

Rupert Hughes's Women (The Seduced, Episode 1) by Karina Longworth

Screen Shot 2018-10-11 at 1.11.36 PM.png

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Welcome to a mini-season of You Must Remember This, peripherally related to Karina Longworth’s new book, Seduction: Sex, Lies and Stardom in Howard Hughes’s Hollywood, which explores the lives and careers of over a dozen actresses who were involved, professionally and/or personally, with Howard Hughes. Inspired by the You Must Remember This episodes on “The Many Loves of Howard Hughes” produced in 2014-2015, the book goes in depth, with much new research, into the stories of stars like Jean Harlow, Ginger Rogers, Ida Lupino, Jane Russell and many more.

In this short series of You Must Remember This, we’ll discuss some of the women who serve as peripheral characters in Seduction: four actresses who were briefly seduced by Hughes, either professionally or romantically, and one writer whose travails in Hollywood during the Hughes era speak to the conflicted female experience behind the camera in 20th century Hollywood.

We’ll begin the season by talking about the complicated, intermingled romantic and professional relationships of Howard’s uncle, Rupert Hughes, who paved the way for his nephew as a Hollywood figure known for his colorful history with women. Howard Hughes was not the first man in his family to find success in Hollywood, or to build a reputation built in part on multiple relationships with women. His uncle, Rupert Hughes, was a respected writer and director in the silent era, whose accomplishments included one of the first Hollywood meta-movies. He also married three times, while making frequent public statements, and films, critiquing marriage and divorce laws. One of his marriages ended in a sensational divorce trial; the other two Mrs. Hughes committed suicide.

 Rupert Hughes, c. 1920-30

Rupert Hughes, c. 1920-30

ambassador-7.jpg

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Charmless Man” by Blur.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Reflectif—Artist Unknown

Feelin’ Lucky—Artist Unknown

Mississippi Ramble 1—Martin Gauffin 

My Simple Thing—Peter Sandberg

Traceless 5-Peter Sandberg

Rendezvous 3—Martin Landh

Song for Johanna-Franz Gordon

Ragtime Jam 3—Magnus Ringblom

Whiskey Rondo—Hakan Eriksson

Jazz And Blue Piano 1—Jonatan Jarpehag

Sleepless—(artist unknown) 

Hot Rod Rebels 5—Victor Olsson

Sunset—Kai Engel 

Bad News Piano—1-Oscar Collin

Speakeasy 2—Gunnar Johnsen

Peaceful Pianos 5—Martin Klem

After the Freakshow—Jenny Roos

 Rupert Hughes and his wife in Photoplay magazine, July 1921

Rupert Hughes and his wife in Photoplay magazine, July 1921

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Special appearance by Noah Segan, as Howard Hughes.

Editor: Olivia Natt.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.