Disney’s Most Controversial Film (Six Degrees of Song of the South, Episode 1) by Karina Longworth

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Disney Plus is launching with the stated intention of streaming the entire Disney library...except for Song of the South, the 1946 animation/live-action hybrid film set on a post-Civil War plantation, which was theatrically re-released as recently as 1986, served as the basis for the ride Splash Mountain, but has never been available in the US on home video. What is Song of the South, why did Disney make it, and why have they held the actual film from release, while finding other ways to profit off of it? Across six episodes of our new season, we’ll dig into all facets of Song of the South’s strange story. Join us, won’t you?

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SHOW NOTES:  

Sources for the whole season:

Walt Disney by Neal Gabler

Disney's Most Notorious Film: Race, Convergence, and the Hidden Histories of Song of the South By Jason Sperb

Birth of an Industry by Nicholas Sammond

Stony the Road by Henry Louis Gates Jr.

White Screens/Black Images by James Snead

Slow Fade to Black by Thomas Cripps

Making Movies Black by Thomas Cripps

Bright Boulevards, Bold Dreams: The Story of Black Hollywood by Donald Bogle

Toms, Coons, Mulattoes, Mammies, and Bucks: An Interpretive History of Blacks in American Films by Donald Bogle

Joel Chandler Harris: A Biography and Critical Study by Bruce R. Bickley Jr.

Sources specific to this episode:

Who’s Afraid of the Song of the South by Jim Korkis

“What’s the Historical Background of ‘Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah’?” by Debi Simons, September 10, 2018, https://www.behind-the-music.com

“10 Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah Facts About Song of the South” by Stacy Conradt, November 12, 2016, http://mentalfloss.com

Diversity in Disney Films: Critical Essays by Johnson Cheu

“The Magic Kingdom: Walt Disney and the American Way of Life” by Steven Watts, The Hollywood Reporter, April 22, 2019

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Controversy” by Prince.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Laurent Edmond Gaston Bacri & Jean-Louis Négro - Snow White & The Dwarves
Laurent Edmond Gaston Bacri & Jean-Louis Négro - Tic Tock Clock
Johnny Pearson - Disney Land
Frank Bernard Woodbridge - Creepy Corner Ghost
Jahzzar - Railroad's Whiskey Co
Paul Martin Pritchard - Wandering Nights
Daniel Horacio Diaz - Fancy Footwalk
John Greaves - Serie Noir
Gooding, Charlie H. Bisharat & Jennifer Anne Wood - The Late War
Joel Vandroogenbroeck - Ghost Town
Joel Vandroogenbroeck - Chain Production
Marc-Olivier Nicolas Dupin - Lola Lola
Alexandre Stephane Rusian Toukaeff, Baptiste Vayer - Serene Pastoral Folk Blues
Daryl Neil Alexander Griffith - Freestylin'
Daniel Horacio Diaz - The Setup
Prince - Controversy

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Jared O'Connell.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

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A preview of the new season of You Must Remember This is out NOW! by Karina Longworth

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This season, we explore the most controversial film in the history of Disney Animation.

With the launch of Disney Plus, the company's entire library could be made available for streaming. The one film promised to remain locked away is Song of the South, the 1946 animation/live-action hybrid set on a post-Civil War plantation. 

What is Song of the South? Why did Disney make it even amidst protests? And why have they held the actual film from release for the past thirty-plus years, while finding other ways to profit off of it?

Join us, won’t you? As we uncover this hidden film in the Disney vault. New episodes of You Must Remember This will be released every Tuesday. Subscribe via Stitcher, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts to hear it!

You Must Remember This Presents by Karina Longworth

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You Must Remember This is coming back this fall, but I am also going to produce a spin-off series tentatively titled “You Must Remember This Presents.” In this spin-off, I will curate and introduce researched stories written and told in the You Must Remember This style by other writers. I’m looking for freelance contributors to pitch me stories, which they will then write/report and read on the podcast. We have a budget to pay writers a decent wage for their contributions.

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Each season will have a theme. The first season is called Make Me Over, and will focus on stories about the intersection of Hollywood and the beauty industry. I’m leaving this prompt purposely vague, because I want to see any and all interpretations of it. The only rules are:

  1. Your story must fit into the You Must Remember This universe, which means it must have some connection to Hollywood in the 20th century. “Hollywood” encompasses movies, television, radio, popular music and the nightclub/vaudeville/ live performance circuit in Los Angeles. If you have a story you really want to tell involving other theater I’m open to it, but a pitch set solely in the New York theater world will probably not be successful. Same goes for stories about non-Hollywood film, unless there is some Hollywood angle. For instance, a story about Coco Chanel doing costumes for Jean Renoir’s The Rules of the Game would not be a great fit, but a story about Coco Chanel’s contract with Samuel Goldwyn could be, if you could find enough story there. Which brings us to the next rule…

  2. You must be able to write a reported/researched essay of about 4000 words on this concept (or, if you’re a radio/podcast person and/or want to do something more interview-based, it will need to cut together into about 30 minutes of audio). Many YMRT episodes have a three-act structure, and all have a story arc. You need to convince me that there is enough material behind your concept to create a narrative podcast episode with a beginning, middle and end. Finally…

  3. Ideally, you have a track record in long form storytelling, in print, radio, podcasting or online. With your pitch, please send a link to one thing we should look at or listen to that shows you can do the research/reporting and tell a sustained story. Again, most of these episodes will involve you reading aloud an essay that you wrote of around 4000 words, so you should feel comfortable writing at that length, and also comfortable speaking into a microphone—or at least, enthusiastic about learning how to. 

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Freelancers whose pitches are chosen will work with Karina to shape their story for the format, and will be given access to a studio in which to record. All of the writing and the recording will take place this fall. If you’re interested, please send a 1-3 paragraph pitch along with a link to an example of your previous long-form writing or radio work to youmustrememberthispodcast@gmail.com (subject line YMRT Presents) by September 10, 2019. If we’re interested, we will contact you for more information. Thanks!

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Become a You Must Remember This Patron, Won't You? by Karina Longworth

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Wondering what's next for Karina and You Must Remember This? Become a Patron and get access to a bi-weekly newsletter, podcast scripts, bonus episodes, and more! 

Starting on June 6, Karina will be dropping the You Must Remember This Book Club podcast for Patrons who join at $10 or more. Each month, she'll be talking to a You Must Remember This listener about a book they love related to Hollywood's first century.

Patreon Levels:

Hedda Hopper | $5 or more per month

Get the inside scoop on what Karina is working on and watching. Patrons get access to a biweekly newsletter with news on the progress of Karina's new projects, movie reviews and recommendations, and links to stuff Karina loves.

Barbara Stanwyck | $10 or more per month

Get the biweekly newsletter, as well as special bonus podcast episodes, including the You Must Remember This Book Club, with special guests!

Dorothy Parker | $15 or more per month

In addition to the newsletter and bonus pods, access  scripts or transcript of every episode in the You Must Remember This Archive. Read along with the pod, or go back to check details without having to scroll through episodes. A great option for the hearing impaired! (Scripts for new episodes will be posted once each episode of the season has been made available)

Judy Garland | $25 or more per month

Get the biweekly newsletter, bonus podcast episodes, transcripts, AND Karina will record an outgoing voicemail or other short audio message of your choosing. One recording per Patron.

Join us on Patreon! by Karina Longworth

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As you probably know, You Must Remember This has been on hiatus since early February. Subscribe to our Patreon page to find out what’s next for the podcast!

Patrons who donate $5 per month will receive a biweekly newsletter, which will be the place to get early/exclusive information about what Karina is working on—including new seasons of You Must Remember This— as well as what she’s reading, watching and recommends.

In the future, Patreon patrons will get exclusive access to special podcast episodes, book clubs, film clubs and more — we’ll be revealing more tiers and more benefits in the coming months. Join us, won’t you?

Ramon Novarro (Fake News: Fact-Checking Hollywood Babylon Episode 19) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on Apple Podcasts.

Ramon Novarro was a Mexican actor and singer whose stardom at MGM in the 1920s and 30s was not impeded by his offscreen life as a gay man. In Hollywood Babylon, Anger focuses only on Novarro’s grisly murder in 1968 -- which outed Novarro to a public that had largely forgotten him--and needlessly embellishes a crime scene that was already pretty horrible. Today, in our final episode of Fact-Checking Hollywood Babylon, we will explore the llife which Anger left out of Hollywood Babylon, and correct that book’s version of Novarro’s death.

Ramon Novarro, Francis X Bushman, and Kathleen Key in  Ben Hur: A Tale of the Christ , 1925

Ramon Novarro, Francis X Bushman, and Kathleen Key in Ben Hur: A Tale of the Christ, 1925

Ramon Novarro & Dorothy Janis in The Pagan, 1929

Ramon Novarro & Dorothy Janis in The Pagan, 1929

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Bye Bye Baby” by Madonna.

Novarro with Greta Garbo in  Mata Hari , 1931

Novarro with Greta Garbo in Mata Hari, 1931

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Cameron Drews.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

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Maureen O'Hara and the Confidential Magazine Trial (Fake News: Fact-Checking Hollywood Babylon Episode 18) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on Apple Podcasts.

In part two of our two-parter on the demise of the biggest and most pernicious tabloid of the 1950s, we’ll explore what happened after the magazine’s claim that redheaded star Maureen O’Hara was caught having sex at Grauman’s Chinese Theater. O’Hara positioned herself the “Joan of Arc” of Hollywood, single-handedly defending a cowardly industry against the existential threat posed by Confidential. As we’ll see, this is one story where the Kenneth Anger version is more credible than the version related by one of the subjects.

Maureen O'Hara in Modern Screen Magazine, 1947

Maureen O'Hara in Modern Screen Magazine, 1947

Maureen O'Hara in Confidential Magazine, March 1957

Maureen O'Hara in Confidential Magazine, March 1957

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Like a Prayer” by Madonna.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Yellow Leaves 5 - Peter Sandberg
Club Noir 2  - John Allen
Unsolved - Mythical Score Society
Southern Flavors 3 - Martin Gauffin
One Two Three 5 - Peter Sandberg
Tomorrow I'll Be Gone - Franz Gordon
City Fashion 3 - Björn Skogsberg 
In The Lounge 02 - Lars Olvmyr
Eventually Maybe - Oakwood Station

Maureen O'Hara, at the Confidential Magazine trial, 1957

Maureen O'Hara, at the Confidential Magazine trial, 1957

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Cameron Drews.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

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Dorothy Dandridge and the Confidential Magazine Trial (Fake News: Fact Checking Hollywood Babylon Episode 17) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on Apple Podcasts.

Over two episodes, we will explore Hollywood Babylon’s coverage of Confidential Magazine and the two celebrities who testified against the scandal rag in the 1957 trial that helped end what Anger rightfully refers to as its “reign of terror.” We’ll begin with Dorothy Dandridge, the first black actress to be nominated for a Best Actress Oscar. Dandridge’s testimony against Confidential reveals the publication’s racist agenda, as well as the double standards that governed her real private and public lives.

Dorothy Dandridge and Harry Belafonte in Carmen Jones (1954)

Dorothy Dandridge and Harry Belafonte in Carmen Jones (1954)

Dorothy Dandridge, Harry Belafonte, Robert Mitchum and Otto Preminger

Dorothy Dandridge, Harry Belafonte, Robert Mitchum and Otto Preminger

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Over and Over” by Madonna.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Yellow Leaves 5 - Peter Sandberg
Club Noir 2  - John Allen
City Fashion 3 - Björn Skogsberg 
A Playful Mood 2 - Peter Sandberg
Downtown Alley 2 - Magnus Ringblom
In The Lounge 02 - Lars Olvmyr
Tomorrow I'll Be Gone - Franz Gordon
In The Lounge 05 - Lars Olvmyr
One Two Three 5 - Peter Sandberg
The Piano And Me 3 - Peter Sandberg
Goofy Moments 3 - Magnus RingblomSay It Is So - Magnus Ringblom Quartet
Eventually Maybe - Oakwood Station

Dorothy Dandridge arrives at the Academy Awards ceremony in 1955, where we was the first African American actress to receive a nomination for Best Actress

Dorothy Dandridge arrives at the Academy Awards ceremony in 1955, where we was the first African American actress to receive a nomination for Best Actress

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Cameron Drews.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

Dorothy Dandridge in LIFE Magazine 1954

Dorothy Dandridge in LIFE Magazine 1954

Bugsy Siegel (Fake News: Fact Checking Hollywood Babylon Episode 16) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on Apple Podcasts.

Jewish gangster Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel is frequently credited with corrupting Hollywood’s unions and “inventing” Las Vegas. Siegel did have moviestar friends, but the true story of his involvement with the Flamingo casino is also the story of a much bigger movieland player: Hollywood Reporter founder/publisher/columnist Billy Wilkerson.

Bugsy Siegel mugshot, 1928

Bugsy Siegel mugshot, 1928

Virginia Hill, 1940's

Virginia Hill, 1940's

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “More” by Madonna.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Yellow Leaves 5 - Peter Sandberg
Club Noir 2  - John Allen
One Two Three 5 - Peter Sandberg
Goofy Moments 3 - Magnus Ringblom
The Piano And Me 3 - Peter Sandberg
Kansas City Flashback 2 - Magnus Ringblom
In The Lounge 02 - Lars Olvmyr
City Fashion 3 - Björn Skogsberg 
Eventually Maybe - Oakwood Station

Billy Wilkerson and his Hollywood Reporter staff

Billy Wilkerson and his Hollywood Reporter staff

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Cameron Drews.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

The Flamingo, Las Vegas, 1947

The Flamingo, Las Vegas, 1947

Marlene Dietrich and Claudette Colbert (Fake News: Fact Checking Hollywood Babylon Episode 15) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on Apple Podcasts.

The bisexuality of Marlene Dietrich was not exactly a secret in 1930s Hollywood -- in fact, her ambiguous sexuality was part of her on-screen brand. But there is some debate as to who Dietrich counted among her lovers, and which of her fellow stars participated in what has been called the “sewing circle” of female intimacy. Anger alleges that Dietrich had a “passionate affair” with Claudette Colbert, an Oscar-winning actress with an extremely heteronormative persona. We’ll explore what was going on in Dietrich’s life and career around the time when this affair could have taken place, and then delve into Colbert’s image as a very different kind of on-screen sex symbol, and her complicated off-screen personal life.

Josef von Sternberg and Marlene Dietrich in Berlin 1928

Josef von Sternberg and Marlene Dietrich in Berlin 1928

Marlene Dietrich, Blonde Venus, 1932

Marlene Dietrich, Blonde Venus, 1932

Claudette Colbert and Clark Gable,  It Happened One Night,  1934

Claudette Colbert and Clark Gable, It Happened One Night, 1934

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Secret Garden” by Madonna.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Yellow Leaves 5 - Peter Sandberg
Club Noir 2  - John Allen
City Fashion 3 - Björn Skogsberg
Tomorrow I'll Be Gone - Franz Gordon
The Piano And Me 3 - Peter Sandberg
Some Autumn Waltz 1 - Jonatan Järpehag
In The Lounge 05 - Lars Olvmyr
In The Lounge 02 - Lars Olvmyr
A Playful Mood 2 - Peter Sandberg
Goofy Moments 3 - Magnus Ringblom
Eventually Maybe - Oakwood Station
Secret Garden - Madonna

Director Cecil B. DeMille with Claudette Colbert on the set of  The Sign of the Cross , 1932

Director Cecil B. DeMille with Claudette Colbert on the set of The Sign of the Cross, 1932

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Cameron Drews.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

Marlene Dietrich and Claudette Colbert, c. 1935

Marlene Dietrich and Claudette Colbert, c. 1935

Lupe Velez (Fake News: Fact Checking Hollywood Babylon Episode 14) by Karina Longworth

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Listen, download this episode, or find on Apple Podcasts.

Mexican actress Lupe Velez was the victim of one of Anger’s cruelest invented stories. His fabrication of her manner of death lays bare a vicious racism in addition to Hollywood Babylon’s usual sexism. Today we will sort out the fact of Velez’s life from Anger’s fiction, and consider the star of the Mexican Spitfire series as comedienne ahead of her time.

Lupe Velez and Douglas Fairbanks in The Gaucho (1927) Gaucho

Lupe Velez and Douglas Fairbanks in The Gaucho (1927) Gaucho

Lupe Velez with Johnny Weissmuller, 1934

Lupe Velez with Johnny Weissmuller, 1934

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Spanish Eyes” by Madonna.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Southern Flavors 3 - Martin Gauffin
Club Noir 2  - John Allen
Come Over To Me - Tommy Ljungberg
One Two Three 5 - Peter Sandberg
Yellow Leaves 5 - Peter Sandberg
Latin Passion - Håkan Eriksson
Amor De Danca 3 - Martin Carlberg
El Que Quiera Bailar 2 - Martin Landh
Unsolved - Mythical Score Society
Neblina 4 - Anders Göransson
A Time To Remember 3 - Martin Landh
Eventually Maybe - Oakwood Station

Studio publicity portrait of Lupe Vélez for film Mexican Spitfire, 1940.

Studio publicity portrait of Lupe Vélez for film Mexican Spitfire, 1940.

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Cameron Drews.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

Stills from Andy Warhol’s 1966 film LUPE starring Edie Sedgwick

Stills from Andy Warhol’s 1966 film LUPE starring Edie Sedgwick

Mary Astor's Diary (Fake News: Fact Checking Hollywood Babylon Episode 13) by Karina Longworth

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Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

In 1936, actress Mary Astor (who had not yet made her most famous film, The Maltese Falcon) and her husband went to court to fight for custody of their four year-old daughter. The trial made international news thanks to both sides’ use of Astor’s diary, in which she had recorded details of her affair with playwright George S. Kaufman. How much did Astor truly reveal in her diary, and what role did the scandal play in her life and career?

Mary Astor testifies in court, 1935 | Photograph by the Los Angeles Times

Mary Astor testifies in court, 1935 | Photograph by the Los Angeles Times

Mary Astor and Humphrey Bogart in The Maltese Falcon, 1941

Mary Astor and Humphrey Bogart in The Maltese Falcon, 1941

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Secret” by Madonna.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Club Noir 2  - John Allen
One Two Three 2 - Peter Sandberg
One Two Three 5 - Peter Sandberg
A Playful Mood 2 - Peter Sandberg
Yellow Leaves 5 - Peter Sandberg
In The Lounge 05 - Lars Olvmyr
In The Lounge 02 - Lars Olvmyr
Downtown Alley 2 - Magnus Ringblom
Say It Is So - Magnus Ringblom Quartet
Tomorrow I'll Be Gone - Franz Gordon
City Fashion 3 - Björn Skogsberg
Eventually Maybe - Oakwood Station

Mary Astor in a still from the trailer for The Great Lie (1941)

Mary Astor in a still from the trailer for The Great Lie (1941)

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Cameron Drews.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

Mary Astor, c. 1920’s

Mary Astor, c. 1920’s

Mae West (Fake News: Fact Checking Hollywood Babylon Episode 12) by Karina Longworth

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Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Today we begin part two of our season, Fake News: Fact Checking Hollywood Babylon. Mae West was the biggest new star in Hollywood in 1933, thanks to two hit films she co-wrote and starred in as a sexually implicit, wisecracking broad who romanced a young Cary Grant. In Hollywood Babylon, Anger credits West’s abrupt decline in movies to a coordinated conspiracy organized by William Randolph Hearst and carried out by the Hays Office. Today we’ll explore West’s background, her history of pushing the censors past the limits of legality, and the truth of her lightning-fast rise in Hollywood and somewhat slower descent back to earth. Featuring special guest Natasha Lyonne!

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

Hollywood Babylon by Kenneth Anger

Goodness Had Nothing To Do With It by Mae West

Becoming Mae West by Emily Wortis Leider

She Always Knew How: Mae West, a Personal Biography by Charlotte Chandler

Hollywood's Censor: Joseph I. Breen and the Production Code Administration by Thomas Doherty

The Dame in the Kimono: Hollywood, Censorship, and the Production Code by Leonard J. Leff


Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “I’m No Angel” by Mae West.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

One Two Three 4 - Peter Sandberg

One Two Three 5 - Peter Sandberg

My Simple Thing 2 - Peter Sandberg

Up We Go 4 - Peter Sandberg

Yellow Leaves 5 - Peter Sandberg

Eventually Maybe - Oakwood Station

Say It Is So - Magnus Ringblom Quartet

In The Lounge 02 - Lars Olvmyr

In The Lounge 05 - Lars Olvmyr

City Fashion 3 - Björn Skogsberg

Tomorrow I'll Be Gone - Franz Gordon

Corny Local Restaurants 2 - Magnus Ringblom

Goofy Moments 3 - Magnus Ringblom

Sophisticated Gentlemen 2 - Magnus Ringblom

Bachelor On The Move 4 - Martin Landh

Thieves Adventures 21 - Magnus Ringblom

Club Noir 2 - John Åhlin

Mae West and Grant in  I'm No Angel  (1933)

Mae West and Grant in I'm No Angel (1933)

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Cameron Drews.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

Mae West, shot by Diane Arbus, c. 1965

Mae West, shot by Diane Arbus, c. 1965

Gina Lollobrigida (The Seduced, Episode 6) by Karina Longworth

Gina Lollobrigida in the 1960s.jpg

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

This Italian pin-up, along with Sophia Loren and Brigitte Bardot, was emblematic of a brand of post-war European sexuality that America happily imported. But the Hollywood career of  “La Lollo” was delayed, thanks to Howard Hughes, whose obsession with Lollobrigida led him to keep her virtually imprisoned in a Los Angeles hotel, and sign her to a contract that made it essentially impossible for her to work for any other US producer.

Gina Lollobrigida in  Bread, Love and Dreams , 1953

Gina Lollobrigida in Bread, Love and Dreams, 1953

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “For Tomorrow” by Blur.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Reflectif - Artist Unknown 

Rendezvous 3 - Martin Landh 

Mysterious Grand Piano - Jonas Elander

Cluedo - Hakan Erikson

Sophisticated Gentleman 3 - Magnus Kingbloom

My Simple Thing 2 - Peter Sandberg

Yellow Leaves 5 - Peter Sandberg

After the Freakshow - Jenny Roos

Jazz and Blue Piano 1-Jonatan Jarpehag

Campers Day-Magnus Ringblom

Tomorrow I’ll Be Gone - Franz Gordon

Speakeasy 2 - Gunnar Johnsen

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Olivia Natt.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

Gina Lollobrigida, 2014 | Photograph by Jonathan Becker for Vanity Fair

Gina Lollobrigida, 2014 | Photograph by Jonathan Becker for Vanity Fair

Yvonne De Carlo (The Seduced, Episode 5) by Karina Longworth

Yvonne_De_Carlo_publicity_photo c. 1955.jpg

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

The future Lily Munster became a star when producer Walter Wanger cast her in Salome, Where She Danced (1945). A curvaceous brunette in her early 20s, De Carlo fit the mold of Howard Hughes’s mid-century girlfriends to a T. But that relationship would be brief, and De Carlo would go on to distinguish herself in movies, TV and as a star of the original production of Stephen Sondheim’s Follies.

Yvonne De Carlo in Salome, Where She Danced (1945)

Yvonne De Carlo in Salome, Where She Danced (1945)

b31c7f2e8df4d31a382dc173d21d0e5a.jpg

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Sing” by Blur.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Reflectif - Artist Unknown 

Green Lace - Artist Unknown

The Smoke Room - Gunnar Johnsen

Tomorrow I’ll Be Gone - Franz Gordon

Speakeasy 2 - Gunnar Johnsen

Club Noir-2 - John Ahlin

Rendezvous 3 - Martin Landh

The Charleston 3 - Hakan Ericsson

Mas Cerca De Ti 5 - Martin Carlberg

Campers Day - Magnus Ringbloom

Muensters Theme Song - Jack Marshall 

Yvonne De Carlo as Lily Munster, c. 1964

Yvonne De Carlo as Lily Munster, c. 1964

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Olivia Natt.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

De Carlo, Yvonne_04.jpg

Linda Darnell (The Seduced, Episode 4) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

A stunning brunette sex symbol married to cinematographer Pev Marley, Darnell thought her affair with Hughes would result in marriage to the aviator. But after Hughes’s near-fatal 1946 plane crash, Marley tried to make a deal to sell his wife to the tycoon--which was not what Darnell wanted. This was not the low point of a life that ended in incredible tragedy, amidst a career that, to this day, has not been given the acclaim it deserves.

Linda Darnell, Jeanne Crain, Ann Sothern, and John Venn in  A Letter to Three Wives , 1949

Linda Darnell, Jeanne Crain, Ann Sothern, and John Venn in A Letter to Three Wives, 1949

Linda Darnell & Joseph L. Mankiewicz, c. 1948

Linda Darnell & Joseph L. Mankiewicz, c. 1948

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “She’s So High” by Blur.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Reflective - Artist Unknown 

Song for Johanna - Franz Gordon

Tomorrow I’ll Be Gone - Franz Gordon

Mas Cerca De Ti 5 - Martin Carlberg

Whiskey Rondo - Hakan Eriksson

Time for Miles - Artist Unknown 

Club Noir 2 - John Ahlin

Speakeasy 2 - Gunnar Johnsen

Victoria’s Vintage Pearls 3 - Peter Sandberg

Sunset - Kai Engel

Sweet Flower Girl - Artist Unknown 

Dust Bowl 1 - Hakan Eriksson

Jazz And Blue Piano 1 - Jonatan Jarpehag 

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Olivia Natt.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

Linda Darnell out (5).jpg

Ann Dvorak (The Seduced, Episode 3) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

The child of a silent film actress, Dvorak was so determined to be a star that at first, she wouldn’t take no for an answer. Her big break came when she was cast in Howard Hughes’s production of Scarface. But Hughes would sell her contract to Warner Brothers, and when Ann later accused Hughes of having “sold [her] down the river,”  she would swiftly suffer the consequences of going up against Hughes in the press when his mastery over the medium of publicity was at its peak.

Paul Muni and Ann Dvorak and in  Scarface , 1932

Paul Muni and Ann Dvorak and in Scarface, 1932

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

Seduction: Sex, Lies, and Stardom in Howard Hughes’s Hollywood by Karina Longworth

Ann Dvorak: Hollywood's Forgotten Rebel by Christina Rice

Howard Hawks: The Grey Fox of Hollywood by Todd McCarthy

“Sold Down the River’ Declares Ann Dvorak.” Los Angeles Times, July 19, 1932

Production Code Administration files on Scarface, Margaret Herrick Library

Lincoln Quarberg files, Special Collections, Margaret Herrick Library

Clips from Scarface (1932) and The Strange Love of Molly Louvain (1932)

Ann Dvorak and Richard Cromwell in  The Strange Love of Molly Louvain  (1932)

Ann Dvorak and Richard Cromwell in The Strange Love of Molly Louvain (1932)

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Slow Down” by Blur.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Reflectif - Artist Unknown 

Time for Miles - Artist Unknown 

Kansas City Flashback 1 - Magnus Ringbloom

Club Noir 2 - John Ahlin

Yellow Leaves 5 - Peter Sandberg

Whiskey Rondo - Hakan Eriksson

Cluedo - Hasan Eriksson 

Tomorrow I’ll Be Gone - Franz Gordon

The Smoke Room - Gunnar Johnson

Loser - Anders Ekengren

After the Freakshow - Jenny Roos

Victoria’s Vintage Pearls 3 - Peter Sandberg

Jazz and Blue Piano 1 - Jonathan Jarpehag

Traceless 5 - Peter Sandberg

Empty Streets - Gunnar Johnson

Got That Feeling - Peter Sandberg

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Special Guest Noah Segan as Howard Hughes

Editor: Olivia Natt.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

Photo from the personal scrapbook of Ann Dvorak/Collection of Christina Rice via Huffington Post

Photo from the personal scrapbook of Ann Dvorak/Collection of Christina Rice via Huffington Post

The Bacchanal of 1920s Hollywood, via Frederica Sagor Maas (The Seduced, Episode 2) by Karina Longworth

Frederica Sagor Maas.jpg

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Seduction begins at an MGM sponsored orgy at the Ambassador Hotel, as told through the eyes of one of the attendees, a young female screenwriter named Frederica Sagor. Sagor would go on to pen one of the frankest memoirs of 1920s Hollywood ever written, revealing the systematic sexual exploitation of women in the film industry by men like Marshall Neilan -- one of Howard Hughes’s early mentors. Frederica’s story also details how tough it was for a woman to hold on to power behind the scenes in the film industry as Hollywood evolved. 

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SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

Seduction: Sex, Lies, and Stardom in Howard Hughes’s Hollywood by Karina Longworth

The Shocking Miss Pilgrim by Frederica Sagor Maas

Lois Weber in Early Hollywood by Shelley Stamp

Are the Stars Out Tonight? The Story of the Famous Ambassador and Cocoanut Grove “Hollywood’s Hotel” by Margaret Tante Burk

Marshall Neilan’s autobiographical notes, Marshall Neilan special collection, Margaret Herrick Library

Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “It Could Be You” by Blur.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Reflectif (Artist Unknown)

The Charleston 1 Hakan Ericsson

Club Noir 4-John Ahlin

Waltz for Cello 3—Jonatan Jarpehag

42nd and Broadway (Artist Unknown)  

Got That Feeling-Peter Sandberg

My Simple Thing—Peter Sandberg

Chamber String Rock-Hakan Ericsson

Kansas City Flashback 1-Magnus Ringbloom

Sad Drama 4-Merlean

Loser-Anders Ekengren

Black and White Memories 3-Martin Hall

Jazz And Blue Piano 1-Jonathan Jarpehag

Viona’s Lullaby-Peter Sandberg

Sunset—Kai Vogel

Marshall Neilan and Mary Pickford on set, c. 1920's | Photo via the Mary Pickford Foundation

Marshall Neilan and Mary Pickford on set, c. 1920's | Photo via the Mary Pickford Foundation

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editor: Olivia Natt.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

Frederica Sagor Maas

Frederica Sagor Maas

Rupert Hughes's Women (The Seduced, Episode 1) by Karina Longworth

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Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

Welcome to a mini-season of You Must Remember This, peripherally related to Karina Longworth’s new book, Seduction: Sex, Lies and Stardom in Howard Hughes’s Hollywood, which explores the lives and careers of over a dozen actresses who were involved, professionally and/or personally, with Howard Hughes. Inspired by the You Must Remember This episodes on “The Many Loves of Howard Hughes” produced in 2014-2015, the book goes in depth, with much new research, into the stories of stars like Jean Harlow, Ginger Rogers, Ida Lupino, Jane Russell and many more.

In this short series of You Must Remember This, we’ll discuss some of the women who serve as peripheral characters in Seduction: four actresses who were briefly seduced by Hughes, either professionally or romantically, and one writer whose travails in Hollywood during the Hughes era speak to the conflicted female experience behind the camera in 20th century Hollywood.

We’ll begin the season by talking about the complicated, intermingled romantic and professional relationships of Howard’s uncle, Rupert Hughes, who paved the way for his nephew as a Hollywood figure known for his colorful history with women. Howard Hughes was not the first man in his family to find success in Hollywood, or to build a reputation built in part on multiple relationships with women. His uncle, Rupert Hughes, was a respected writer and director in the silent era, whose accomplishments included one of the first Hollywood meta-movies. He also married three times, while making frequent public statements, and films, critiquing marriage and divorce laws. One of his marriages ended in a sensational divorce trial; the other two Mrs. Hughes committed suicide.

Rupert Hughes, c. 1920-30

Rupert Hughes, c. 1920-30

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Music:

The music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Charmless Man” by Blur.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

Reflectif—Artist Unknown

Feelin’ Lucky—Artist Unknown

Mississippi Ramble 1—Martin Gauffin 

My Simple Thing—Peter Sandberg

Traceless 5-Peter Sandberg

Rendezvous 3—Martin Landh

Song for Johanna-Franz Gordon

Ragtime Jam 3—Magnus Ringblom

Whiskey Rondo—Hakan Eriksson

Jazz And Blue Piano 1—Jonatan Jarpehag

Sleepless—(artist unknown) 

Hot Rod Rebels 5—Victor Olsson

Sunset—Kai Engel 

Bad News Piano—1-Oscar Collin

Speakeasy 2—Gunnar Johnsen

Peaceful Pianos 5—Martin Klem

After the Freakshow—Jenny Roos

Rupert Hughes and his wife in Photoplay magazine, July 1921

Rupert Hughes and his wife in Photoplay magazine, July 1921

Credits:

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Special appearance by Noah Segan, as Howard Hughes.

Editor: Olivia Natt.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

Clara Bow (Fake News: Fact Checking Hollywood Babylon Episode 11) by Karina Longworth

Listen, download this episode, or find on iTunes.

We’ll close this half of our Hollywood Babylon season with one of that book’s most famously distorted stories: the tale of “It” Girl Clara Bow’s supposed nymphomania and alleged “tackling” of the entire USC football team. The real story of Clara Bow’s life and career is a much richer tale, involving changing sexual mores, and the change in the audience’s tastes that overlapped with the end of the silent era. Featuring special guest Natasha Lyonne!

Clara Bow and the WAMPAS Baby Stars of 1924

Clara Bow and the WAMPAS Baby Stars of 1924

Portrait of Clara Bow, 1920's

Portrait of Clara Bow, 1920's

SHOW NOTES:  

Sources:

This episode is a response to, and includes a brief excerpt from, Hollywood Babylon by Kenneth Anger.

Clara Bow: Runnin’ Wild by David Stenn

Directed by Dorothy Arzner by Judith Mayne

Silent Stars by Jeanine Basinger

Moving Pictures: Memories of a Hollywood Prince by Budd Schulberg

The New York Graphic: The World’s Zaniest Newspaper by Lester Cohen

Final Thoughts on The “It” Girl and the Secretary, derangedlacrimes.com

The Evening Graphic's Tabloid Reality By Bob Stepno, stepno.com

Clara Bow and Charles "Buddy" Rogers in Wings, 1927

Clara Bow and Charles "Buddy" Rogers in Wings, 1927

Music:

Original music was composed for this episode by Evan Viola. Most of the rest of the music used in this episode, with the exception of the intro and outro, was sourced from royalty-free music libraries and licensed music collections. The intro includes a clip from the film Casablanca. The outro song this week is “Daughter of a Child” by The Auteurs.

Excerpts from the following songs were used throughout the episode:

The Smoke Room - Gunnar Johnsen  
After the Freakshow - Jenny Roos
Cinema Romanza 14 - Jonatan Jarpehag
Bad News Piano 02 - Oscar Collin
Angry Cats - Hakan Ericsson
Loser - Anders Ekengren
My Simple Thing 2 - Peter Sandberg
Mississippi Ramble 1 - Martin Gauffin
I Don’t Smoke - Mythical Score Society
“Fight On” - Milo Sweet, 1922 (USC Fight Song) 
The Hepcat Swagger - Martin Landh
My Simple Thing - Peter Sandberg
Music from “The Wild Party” 1929 - John Leipold
French Girls - Hakan Eriksson
Dust Bowl 1 - Hakan Eriksson
Cluedo - Hakan Eriksson
People Falling Down 3 - Gavin Luke
Black and White Memories 3 - Martin Hall
Whiskey Rondo - Hakan Eriksson
Mas Cerca De Ti 5 - Martin Carlberg
Music from “Call Her Savage” 1932 - Peter Brunelli, Arthur Lange
Sad Piano Walk 1 - Oscar Collin  

clara-rex-kids.jpg

Credits:

Our special guest this week is Matt Bomer.

This episode was written, narrated and produced by Karina Longworth.

Editors: Sam Dingman and Jacob Smith.

Research and production assistant: Lindsey D. Schoenholtz.

Social media assistant: Brendan Whalen.

Logo design: Teddy Blanks.

Marilyn Monroe as Clara Bow, photographed by Richard Avedon

Marilyn Monroe as Clara Bow, photographed by Richard Avedon